Qatar Airways Cargo, First Ground Handling Company To Get CEIV-Li-Batt Certification

Qatar Airways Cargo becomes the first ground handling company and second airline in the world to get CEIV-Li-Batt certification.

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Qatar Airways Cargo, First Ground Handling Company To Get CEIV-Li-Batt Certification

Qatar Airways Cargo has become the second airline in the world to receive the IATA Center of Excellence for Independent Validators Lithium Batteries (CEIV-Li-Batt) certification. This also makes it the first ground-handling cargo company in the world to receive this certification.

The official announcement read as “The certification aims to improve safety in the handling and transportation of lithium batteries throughout the supply chain. Both Qatar Airways and Qatar Aviation Services played a key role in the design and implementation of IATA’s recent CEIV lithium battery program, and continue to be actively involved in its fine-tuning and adaption.”

It also said, “Passenger and cargo safety is our utmost concern at all times, and we have continuously advocated for proper regulation in the transport of lithium batteries,” says Akbar Al Baker, Chief Executive, Qatar Airways Group. “We are happy to be the second airline to be certified, and we encourage all air industry players to become certified. As an industry, we must focus on active risk prevention, which is achieved through strict regulation, training, and compliance.”

When asked the same question, the officials replied, “Our plan now is to work with our global partners, ground handlers, shippers, and freight forwarders, to ensure a solid and common understanding of the risks of moving lithium batteries, and to drive positive change in the industry. This certification comes soon after Halleux urged for faster regulation and compliance adoption concerning lithium batteries at the World Cargo Symposium in Dublin. Shortly after, we announced the complete rollover of its 10,000+ ULD fleet to Safran Cabin’s newly developed fire-resistant containers (FRC), designed to resist a lithium-based fire for up to six hours. To date, it has already replaced 9,000 of its ULDs, surpassing the 70 percent goal it set itself for 2022, and will continue the exchange process in 2023.”

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